Archive for June, 2013

Take steps to limit your liability for summer employees

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 2.3 million workers between the ages of 16 and 24 years of age are hired for

Beware of the risks associated with seasonal help

Beware of the risks associated with seasonal help

summer employment. On average, one of these summer employees will be injured on the job every five seconds. Most of these work related injuries are both needless and costly to the employer. The three main causes for the majority of these injuries are due to inexperience, lack of training and inadequate supervision. There are a number of proactive steps that employers can take to limit their exposure and reduce their liability.

Steps to Take Beforehand. Business owners would be wise to develop safe working practices for summer help.  Here are some simple but practical steps you can employ to reduce your costs from job related injuries this summer:

  • Ask yourself what hazards the summer worker will be exposed to, including any pertinent risks outside the immediate working area.
  • Consider carefully the personnel who are to be involved in the training process and ensure they are well versed in the training procedures.
  • Always try to assign an experienced worker as a supervisor and ensure they keep a watchful eye on the summer worker over the first several days.
  • Make sure that any equipment to be used is examined and operational beforehand. Ensure that all legally required equipment safety guards are in place.

Take the Time to Give an Adequate Safety Orientation. Even More

Understand the fine points of Waivers of Subrogation

Suppose you’re an air conditioning contractor and while installing a system for a new industrial building, there is an accident. Another contractor’s employee on the job site suffers injuries when your scaffolding collapses and falls on top of him. The injured worker sues the AC contractor and the project owner. The project’s contract included a requirement that the contractor assume the owner’s liability for any accidents arising out of the contractor’s work. Consequently, the contractor’s General Liability insurance company pays the injured worker for both the contractor and owner’s shares of the damages. The insurance company, however, has determined that the owner was 20% responsible for the accident. It files a claim with the owner demanding some of its money back.

The insurance company’s action is entirely legal. Many project owners and general contractors, wanting to avoid this situation, insist that their subcontractors agree to a waiver of subrogation. More

Why D&O coverage is vital for small and medium sized firms

Directors & Officers Liability coverage is important for all medium and small firms. This form of coverage protects personal assets of directors and officers during a lawsuit stemming from mismanagement. When they’re charged with mismanaging the company, directors and officers who don’t have this type of insurance face the risk of significant losses. Directors and officers liability affords them the protection they need, and money for their legal expenses is also provided. If the company they work for must be brought into the lawsuit, this coverage may also be extended to include the company itself. There are many other beneficial provisions these policies offer.

Directors and Officers Make Mistakes. Nobody is perfect, so it’s important to be prepared for directors and officers to make mistakes. Although most mistakes that require this coverage are the result of negligence, it’s important to remember that anyone is capable of making such mistakes. Although training directors and officers to make responsible and ethical choices is necessary, don’t pay so much for training that there isn’t enough money for liability coverage. It’s better to create a healthy balance by preparing representatives and obtaining coverage to protect them. More

The Importance of Employment Practices Liability Insurance

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Since Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed, the issue of employees’ rights continues to be controversial.

Understanding How Fast Lawsuit Risks Are Increasing. As more laws are enacted for workplaces, employers face a higher risk of lawsuits. The likelihood of discrimination lawsuits is especially high. In order to minimize this risk, employers need to create a workplace that offers workers equal rights, opportunities, job access, working conditions, job security and opportunities for advancement. They must also strive to create a workplace that is in compliance with federal employment guidelines for mature and disabled workers. During the period between 1992 and 2004, the number of individual discrimination charges jumped from 72,302 to 79,432 annually. These figures, which were collected by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, include all types of discrimination filings. More